Read your Full copy
Read your Full copy
Read your Full copy
Read your Full copy

Asia's leading yachting lifestyle media

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Reviews

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

Prestige’s asymmetrical X60 is surprisingly different to her big sister

Prestige’s asymmetrical X60 is surprisingly different to her big sister

SHARE

Set to arrive in this region in 2023 through Asia Yachting, the new Prestige X60 is full of surprises, including just how different she is to her big sister. By John Higginson.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

 

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The X60 is the second model in Prestige X-Line


Prestige’s new X60 has a hard act to follow. Her elder sister, the X70, was a revolution for both the market and the French builder, renowned for its classic F-Line and S-Line ranges up to the 690 and a world leader in the 40-60ft motor yachts sector.

The X70 broke the mould, shaking things up with its forward-raked windscreen, infinity cockpit and widebody superstructure, a radical new concept executed by Italy’s Garroni Design, which has designed all Prestige models since the brand emerged as a Jeanneau offshoot in 1989.

A full-beam saloon and no side decks were among major points of difference for the X70, while the upgraded furnishings, décor and details elevated the image of Prestige, which has also rolled out the new interior styling on its 690 flybridge motor yacht.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The X60 is also by Garroni Design


The four-cabin X70 was a remarkable start for the X-Line, which has now widened its range with the three-cabin X60, a model that shares many of the winning features of the flagship yet is surprisingly different in so many ways.

Erwin Bamps, Brand Director of Prestige since November 2018, explains: “The X60 is the second model in the X-Line, so it had to be coherent with the concepts we introduced on the X70. These include greater connectivity, meaning the easy level of circulation around a monohull boat, while inside there’s a higher level of finishing and finesse, and a richness of materials.

“On the X70, it was possible to use the full beam for the main-deck interior because of its proportions. However, on the X60, we chose an asymmetric design with one side deck, which offered the best solution to gain interior space on the main deck and yet give accessibility from the aft cockpit to the foredeck.”

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The beach club features a drop-down sofa


From afar, the X60 is recognisable as an X-Line model, with a reverse windscreen and dark wheelhouse roof, although new touches include replacing the hard top’s side supports with double carbon poles.

The iconic beach club is reassuringly similar and features a hydraulic swim platform with built-in steps to port, a hot and cold shower, as well as a fold-down sofa that allows guests to sit and lounge comfortably by the water.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The large infinity cockpit has multiple furniture options


Like on the X70, the oversized teak platform is overlooked by aft-facing seating and an infinity cockpit, so guests enjoy views of the sea and beach club through the clear glass balustrade.

FUN FOREDECK, FAB FLYBRIDGE
Once you reach the main deck, however, the differences to the X70 start to become apparent. Most notable is that the X60 isn’t a full widebody but instead has one side deck, to port.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The X60 features one side deck, to port


This passageway leads to the foredeck, which is one of the X60’s signature features and can also be accessed by a short starboard side deck starting by the indoor helm. A world away from the flat foredeck on the X70, the X60 features a beautiful sunken bow lounge, with seating and sunpads plus drinks holders on both sides of a movable octagon-shaped teak table.

The central pads on each side include a fold-up backrest, while the forward two pads on both sides can be removed to reveal four storage lockers. For cover, a canopy can be erected using four poles inserted into deck holes.

The clever sunken foredeck lounge


“The foredeck is not just for sunbathing but a proper outdoor social area, like you have in the cockpit or flybridge. It gives you another entertainment space for people to meet, to have a drink,” Bamps says. “If you have six or eight people, groups can split up around the boat and find their own space when they want to.”

The flybridge, accessed by starboard stairs from the cockpit, spans an area of 26sqm (280ft), which Prestige says is 30 per cent bigger than the flybridge on the comparably sized 590 F-Line flybridge model.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The large flybridge has a huge wet bar


The area covered by an electric sunroof features an athwartships dining table and chairs by Roda Teka.

Forward is a fitted L-shaped sofa to starboard, while to port is an outdoor galley with a grill, fridge, sink and storage, and a twin helm station with Garmin screens, autopilot and VHF. Unlike the X70, there are no stairs to the foredeck.

The aft area is clear for loose furniture


The aft flybridge area is clear of fixtures but includes, as standard, an island lounger with movable, weighted backrests, while options include sunbeds or two island loungers either side of a drinks table.

BREEZY INDOOR-OUTDOOR LIVING
On the main deck, there are also furniture options for the aft cockpit, with an island lounger again the standard option.

However, the X-Line’s features include an extra-long cockpit and although it’s not as noticeable on the X60, there’s enough room to complement the island lounger with an optional dining table and loose chairs, offering another alfresco dining area and increasing the social options.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The saloon features a sliding door to port


In contrast to Prestige’s F-Line and S-Line models, which have an aft-galley layout, the X-Line is more in line with larger luxury motor yachts by having the galley forward.

Along with the starboard side deck, the saloon on the X60 is among the major differences compared to the X70, although both models feature interiors designed with Italian Valentina Militerno de Romedis.

Instead of the saloon spanning one side of the hull to the other, the inclusion of a side deck on the X60 reduces the relative indoor space, although Prestige has offset this by including a sliding glass door to port, meaning the saloon is truly open to the sun and breeze on two sides.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The X60 focuses on indoor-outdoor living


Prestige says the semi-widebody design provides interior width not found on another 60ft monohull, yet that feels slightly undermined when you enter the interior, as the private staircase to the master suite – a brand signature – reduces the width of the living area by a metre or so.

“On the X60, we couldn’t use the full beam for the interior because the staircase to the top would have been too steep and you’d lose too much space on the flybridge if you had two accesses,” Bamps says. “However, the sliding side door in the saloon combined with the two sliding doors aft allow you to sit inside yet feel as though you’re outside.”

SOFT INTERIOR LUXURY
The saloon includes two beige Duvivier sofas: a two-seat version to port and an L-shaped one to starboard, where there’s also a foldable table.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The galley has high-low storage cabinets

 

The full-height glass door and window to port are complemented by large windows starboard and forward, so guests can enjoy panoramic views including through to the windscreen as well as plenty of natural light.

The interior features hardwood oak flooring and Walnut woodwork, and the detailing is top-drawer, in line with the X70. To starboard, aft of the slightly raised helm station, is an open, three-sided galley, which has a three-zone induction cooktop, microwave/grill and – a personal favourite – two high-low storage units that can electrically descend to provide a flush countertop when needed.

To port is more storage, a fridge-freezer and another Laminam ceramic worktop, while forward is a raised L-shaped sofa, offering companion seating for the skipper and a nice cosy snug for reading, with great views outside and inside the boat.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The port side offers a raised corner sofa

 

The raised helm has a dark-leather bench seat and includes a joystick as part of the Zeus drive package, the option of two 12-inch or 16-inch standalone screens, and a full-height door to the short side deck.

CABINS SUPREME
However, Prestige’s upgraded fabrics, finishes and detailing are arguably best showcased in the stunning guest cabins, led by the magnificent full-beam master suite, which features super-soft carpeting and beautifully combines soothing natural colours with wood, velvet and a variety of tactile surfaces.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The full-beam master suite

 

Accessed by a wide staircase and situated midships – not in the bow, as on the X70 – the master has a forward-facing bed, a sofa to port and storage on both sides, with the whole room benefiting from huge hull windows plus port holes on both sides. The mood lighting including above, behind and below the bed is discreet and elegant.

Forward is a TV flanked by two sliding doors. The starboard one leads to a bathroom with a Corian countertop and plenty of mirrors, while the port one accesses an elegant walk-in wardrobe, with both rooms having access to the central rain shower.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The TV is flanked by doors to the wardrobe and bathroom

 

The two guest cabins are reached from the stairs beside the lower helm and the VIP could be a contender for best in class. The double bed, which can ‘scissor’ into singles, sits lower than is usual for a cabin in the bow, feeling more like a conventional cabin than one squeezed too far up into the forepeak.

The room also benefits from a skylight and, like the master, is beautifully finished and well equipped, featuring wardrobes and storage on both sides, a gorgeous standalone vanity to port, and an en-suite bathroom to starboard.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The forward VIP suite is among best in class


The bathroom can be used as the day head and potentially shared by those staying in the port-side guest cabin, which has twin beds that can slide together and the option of an en-suite bathroom to replace the VIP cabin’s port cupboard.

Although designed with owner-operators in mind, the X60 is a big yacht so there’s a comfortable crew cabin aft of the engine room, which houses twin 600hp Cummins engines that provide comfortable performance, with a top speed of 25 knots and a cruising speed of 20. Onboard technology includes Groupe Beneteau’s Ship Control and Seanapps systems.

Prestige, X60, X70, Review, Yacht Style, Erwin Bamps, Tanguy Tertrais

The first X60 in Asia arrives in 2023

 

The first unit in Asia has already been secured by Asia Yachting and is scheduled for a mid-2023 arrival to the delight of Tanguy Tertrais, the Hong Kong-based APAC Sales Director for Prestige and Jeanneau.

“We’re really looking forward to having one more X-Line unit in this part of the world,” Tertrais says. “We strongly believe the X-Line perfectly suits the demand here, with reinvented space on board for greater volume and a design that’s more open to the sea.”
www.prestige-yachts.com
www.asiayachting.net

 

SHARE

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

Excess 14 embodies DNA of sporty catamaran brand

Excess 14 embodies DNA of sporty catamaran brand

SHARE

As the latest model by the young Groupe Beneteau brand, the twin-helm Excess 14 is the best example yet of the company’s DNA, delivering the ‘sensations of sailing’ and a sporty vibe with a bright interior and creative accommodation options. By Geoffroy Langlade.

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

 

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

The standard rig includes a square-top mainsail and overlapping genoa, while a Code 0 is optional

 

Excess has been fine-tuning its designs since it entered the market in 2019 with the launches of the Excess 12 and Excess 15. The latter remains the flagship of the young brand owned by Groupe Beneteau, whose portfolio includes Lagoon, the world’s most prolific pleasure catamaran builder with about 600 units a year.

However, Groupe Beneteau created Excess to help fill a gap in the market between luxury cruising cats and – at the other end of the spectrum – the stripped-down, high-tech racing cats.

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

Skippers can enjoy the sensation of sailing

 

Excess doesn’t claim to offer racer-style performance, but is instead focused on giving owners the feeling of sailing fast, stating that catamarans should not be restricted to a choice between comfort or sensations. As such, the signature helms at the aft end of each hull offer wind in the hair, sea spray and the sound of lapping water, all while staying connected to family and friends in the cockpit.

After using modified Lagoon moulds for the hulls of the Excess 12 (38ft hull) and 15 (47ft hull), the builder then developed the all-new Excess 11 (36ft hull), with the accomplished entry-level model debuting at Boot Dusseldorf in January 2020.

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

The Excess 14 features naval architecture by VPLP

 

All three models have since made it to Asia-Pacific. The first Excess 12 in Australia arrived in late 2020, while last year, Asia’s first Excess 11 was delivered to Japan and an Excess 15 sailed to New Zealand.

Back in France, Excess consolidated all its learnings and developments into its newest and most ambitious model yet – the Excess 14. The hull and exterior were again designed in collaboration with VPLP Design, renowned for its work in sailing monohulls and multihulls and a specialist in ocean racing, while Italy’s Nauta Design handled the interior.

Like all Excess models, the yacht has a helm station at the aft end of each hull

 

The Excess 14 had its world premiere at the Cannes Yachting Festival in September 2022 and enjoyed a lot of attention for her sleek, sporty look and colourful touches, with bright orange popping up on the outdoor upholstery, steering wheels, ‘Excess 14’ logo and even the trim of the genoa.

“The Excess 14 is the pure concentration of the Excess DNA,” says Thibaut de Montvalon, the company’s Brand Director and former Managing Director of Groupe Beneteau Asia-Pacific based in Hong Kong.

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

The Excess 14 is designed for owners with a sporty lifestyle

 

“It’s a boat that’s fun, that’s lively. It’s a cruising catamaran with outstanding lines that have benefited from an understanding of ocean racing. And it required profound naval architectural work to come up with many innovative solutions, both in the charter and owner versions.”

With full-scale production starting next year, the first unit for Asia is scheduled to arrive in Japan by the end of 2023. Other Asia-Pacific deliveries include to Tahiti, also late next year, then to both Australia and New Zealand in the first half of 2024.

PURE EXCESS
The Excess 14 has a 44ft hull and an overall length starting from about 46ft, depending on the bowsprit and any stern appendages. It has a beam of almost 26ft and is just 7in slimmer than the flagship 15. The model therefore enters the very competitive 45ft catamaran sector populated in Asia by experienced competitors such as Lagoon, Fountaine Pajot, Leopard and Bali.

The yacht features asymmetric hulls


First off, a major point of difference is the twin helms, an Excess signature inspired by monohulls. Each helm station has a Garmin screen and a bench seat, offers a good view of the sails and limits the length of the lines to offer more sensations to the helmsman.


Hervé Piveteau, Product Manager of Excess, says: “We put a lot of effort into reducing weight, optimising the sail area to weight ratio, and gains in the structural design. However, it’s not only about performance but about sensations.

“Our objective is that the skipper steering the boat will have the same sensations as they would have on a monohull. It’s all about sailing sensations.”

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

At anchor, the foredeck can be dressed with sunpads

 

On the Excess 14, all manoeuvres from the mast are handled on starboard, where two Harken winches also trim the genoa, while there’s just the winch for the genoa on port side. Both helms have direct contact with the deeper rudder blades, which increase the draught to 4ft 10in.

The rig includes a forward-stepped mast, low boom and a composite bowsprit, along with a square top mainsail and large overlapping genoa as standard, which provide an impressive sail area to displacement ratio. There’s even an optional Pulse Line package, which increases the upwind sail area from 123sqm to 135sqm.

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

The wide cockpit features a huge aft bench, dining area and chaise longue

 

Built in foam sandwich with carbon reinforcements, the Excess 14 includes a lower freeboard to reduce windage and an increased bridgedeck clearance for better passage through the water, while the hulls were designed asymmetrically with inverted and inclined bows to reduce interference drag.

LIGHT & BRIGHT
In terms of outdoor social areas, the cockpit features a wide sofa aft, an L-shaped sofa and a dining table to port, plus a facing settee or chaise longue to starboard. The foredeck is clean, but can be set up with a couple of sunpads with adjustable backrests. There’s also the option of a flybridge-style ‘skylounge’ on top of the coachroof, but this can only be used at anchor due to the low boom.

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

The indoor dining area in the saloon and alfresco dining area in the cockpit

 

Nauta Design worked on the interior, which is noticeably bright due to the clear, ‘untinted’ windows all around the saloon. There’s also the option for a through-breeze due to a pair of rectangular portholes at the front and one to port, above the cooking area.

“With Nauta, the goal was to maintain volume and good headroom, all this in a warm and bright-as ever interior design,” says Piveteau, who has been with Groupe Beneteau for over two decades. “We made no compromise on the internal comfort, whether it’s the headroom, volume of the cabins, the size of the berths, even the volume of the fridges.”

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

The interior starts with a full-width galley

 

The L-shaped galley to port also includes twin sinks and plenty of storage below and above, while there’s refrigeration and more storage on the starboard side. The dining table, an L-shaped sofa and loose chairs are forward, while to port is a pull-out chart table with storage underneath.

Accommodation options below include a symmetrical four-cabin ‘charter’ version, with each room boasting an en-suite bathroom with separate shower, while options include a crew cabin in each of the forepeaks.

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

In the three-cabin version, the master suite occupies most of the starboard hull

 

The three-cabin version includes a large master suite on the starboard side with an office in the middle and a bathroom forward. Further forward still is a utility room that can be used as a walk-in wardrobe or storage room for water sports equipment and gear, or can be set up with twin beds, ideal for a family with kids.

“This extra room gives the owner huge volume and a unique storage area that can become an extra cabin, offering fantastic versatility,” Piveteau says. “And the charter version with four ensuite bathrooms with separate showers and space for two crew cabins is a first for a 44-footer.”

Excess, 14, 11, 12, 15, catamaran, Cannes Yachting Festival, Groupe Beneteau, Lagoon, Boot Dusseldorf, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Thibaut de Montvalon, VPLP Design, Nauta Design, Hervé Piveteau

The forward utility room can be a walk-in wardrobe, storage room or twin cabin

 

However, Piveteau ultimately doesn’t believe Excess is in competition with other cruising catamaran builders, believing that the bold newcomer is steering its own path in the multihull market.

“The Excess 14 is not a cruising catamaran,” he says. “It’s more of an attractive sailboat with two hulls. This is what we call the Excess DNA.”
excess-catamarans.com

 

SHARE

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

Sanlorenzo’s seriously smart performer

Sanlorenzo’s seriously smart performer

SHARE

The super-sleek SP110 is making waves around the world with its triple waterjets, 40-knot top speed and 4ft draft, but Sanlorenzo’s first ‘Smart Performance’ sports yacht is as notable for its efficient propulsion and energy systems, and attractive atrium-style interior. And it’s coming to Asia, with a sale already secured by Simpson Marine.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

Bernardo Zuccon designed the shark-like exterior

 

Exterior designer Bernardo Zuccon says the knife-like profile of the SP110 was inspired by the great white shark. Sanlorenzo Art Director Pierro Lissoni says “one feels its architectural power” when inside the atrium-style interior. Tilli Antonelli, Product and Development Manager of Sanlorenzo’s SP line, describes the shipyard’s first Smart Performance model as an “elegant, powerful, absolutely unique yacht” and a “major driver of innovation”.

 

Certainly, Sanlorenzo’s quest for innovation shows no signs of slowing down with the SP110, its first open coupè and its fastest yacht to date.

 

In fact, the two-deck design is so far removed from the SL, SD and SX flybridge yacht ranges that it’s reaching a new sector of owners, including one who switched to an SP110 from a sailing boat. Sanlorenzo Asia, represented by Simpson Marine, secured a sale in this region soon after the model’s world premiere at the Cannes Yachting Festival.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

Marco Arnaboldi designed the hull

 

Upon closer inspection, it’s a model that possesses plenty of the shipyard’s DNA along with plenty from Antonelli, an industry pioneer behind brands such as Pershing and Wider. His influence is evident in the choice of three MJP waterjets, which work with triple 2,000hp MAN V12 engines to produce a top speed of 40 knots or even 43 knots with the 2,200hp options.

 

They’re impressive figures for a superyacht and a credit to hull designer Marco Arnaboldi – another member of the SP110’s all-star design team – who optimised the 108ft-long, 27ft-beam planing hull for use with hydrojet propulsion.

 

Another key contributor to efficiency is the use of lightweight materials, with a fibreglass hull topped by a superstructure in carbon and epoxy. The hull design, waterjets and light materials all contribute to a super-shallow draft of just 1.3m at full load, so you can pretty much go wherever there’s water.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

The three MJP waterjets

 

“The waterjets give the yacht its very shallow draft, incredible comfort and flexibility in navigation, with full respect for the environment,” Antonelli says. “This is what characterises SP110 and its originality.”


LEAN AND GREEN

In an era with increasing focus on fuel emissions and a huge push for greener propulsion and operational systems, even Sanlorenzo Chairman Massimo Perotti admits that the high-speed SP110 may be a more niche offering than more voluminous models from the well-established SL, SD and SX series.

 

But that’s where the ‘Smart’ in Smart Performance comes in. Sure, the SP110 can seriously shift when it needs to, but Sanlorenzo says its performance is matched by impressive efficiency, the driving force behind the boat’s fractional propulsion system.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

Solar panels cover the forward half of the roof of the SP110

 

To improve efficiency at slower speeds, the yacht can use just one engine or only the two outer engines, which is each paired with a steering waterjet as opposed to the central thruster.

 

“Personally, I think the best performance in terms of economy is at 10 knots, with the two side engines running at about 800-900rpm and consumption at about 110-112 litres per hour,” Antonelli says.

 

Furthermore, the SP110 incorporates a solar-electric energy system to help power onboard systems. High-efficiency 6kW monocrystalline solar panels cover the forward half of the roof and work with a package of lithium batteries to potentially run hotel functions for a few hours each day without the use of generators.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

The foredeck offers access to a concealed working area

 

On a summer day in Mediterranean waters, over 60kW a day can be produced, which can run hotel loads for 4hrs based on an average of 15kWh. However, the deckhouse roof offers more than just solar panels, also featuring a full-width sunbathing area and even a cleverly disguised helm station that can fold down flush into the black superstructure.

 

OUTDOOR SURPRISES

While Antonelli is focused on the Smart Performance line, the SP110’s exterior and interior designers, Bernardo Zuccon and Piero Lissoni, are common to many of Sanlorenzo’s other series and models. In fact, Zuccon admitted it was a “complex task” finding the balance between the SP110’s dynamic performance and the need for elegant, comfortable outdoor and indoor spaces.

 

“While respecting the stylistic features that historically characterise this type of boat, such as the aerodynamic and extremely organic surfaces, with Tilli Antonelli we arrived at a compromise: a dialogue between dynamism and liveability not normally perceived on boats of this size,” said Zuccon, whose parents Gianni and Paola founded Zuccon International Project.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

The tender is stored below the deck forward of the fold-out platform

 

Outdoor social areas include the foredeck, which includes a five-person sunbathing area and a further island sunpad forward, while all the technical equipment is neatly hidden in the forepeak under a foldup cover. Just below, the top section of the almost-vertical bow can lift forward to deploy the retractable anchor.

 

However, the main outdoor zone is the vast aft cockpit or terrace, an area whose increasing importance on Sanlorenzo models was highlighted by its significant size on the SX series and which has been replicated on smaller models by sister brand Bluegame.

 

On the SP110, the aft terrace is an almost square space measuring about 7m by 7m, so offering about 50sqm of space for outdoor furniture, water toys and whatever else an owner might wish to use it for. It also includes not one but two party tricks, starting with the 5m-wide aft transom folding out to become a waterside swim platform and reveal integrated steps leading down to it.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

The swim platform can fold out to reveal integrated steps

 

However, unveiling the hidden tender is even more fun to watch. Firstly, three thin, long panels – one on each side and one aft of the outdoor furniture – open to allow a three-sided davit to electronically rise to an almost vertical position, where it looks like the posts and crossbar of a football goal.

 

After that, a roughly 5m by 2m deck panel pivots up and forward to reveal the tender, which is hoisted in the air, moved aft and then lowered into the water by the moving davit.


LIGHT AND BRIGHT

If the exterior makes it obvious that Sanlorenzo is entering a new sector with the SP110, the sliding aft doors show the shipyard is also not standing still with interior design.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

View of the atrium-style interior

 

Having already worked on the interior of the SX88, Piero Lissoni was appointed as the company’s in-house Art Director in 2018, the year of Sanlorenzo’s 60th anniversary. Since then, he has overseen many of the interior layouts of the builder’s models but the atrium-style design of the SP110 interior may be one of his finest works yet.

 

Whether you’re standing on the aft terrace, swim platform or even the dock, you have a clear view through to both the lower lounge and the main deck above.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

Forward view of the saloon and dining area

 

Both decks are connected by what Lissoni describes as a “hyper-technological staircase” to starboard and both are far more relaxing, comfortable and welcoming than the minimalist exterior might suggest.

 

Antonelli is full of praise for the connectivity of the outdoor and indoor areas. “The SP110 is designed to be social,” he says. “When one guest is reading a magazine on the main deck, another is watching a movie in the lower lounge and others are sunbathing or playing on the aft deck, they can all communicate. They’re in separate areas, but they’re all connected.”

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

Starboard view of the dining area, which has sliding doors each side

 

Inside, Lissoni themes include long sight lines, big windows, large openings and clear deck spaces that can be dressed by owners how they wish. Sanlorenzo prides itself on its customisation, which is illustrated by the interior of hull one, Almax, being notably different to the furniture layouts on the model’s original deck plans.

 

In essence, the main deck is designed to start with an open saloon, while forward is a dining area flanked by huge sliding doors on both sides for a pleasant cross breeze and beautiful sea views.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

Aft view of the saloon and upper window above the aft doors

 

On Almax, a port side door leads to a day head and a large galley to starboard, while forward is a zen-like helm station, with a single, adjustable helm seat and a simple sofa and foldable table to starboard. To port is the staircase to the crew quarters, which has a captain’s cabin and two twins.

 

On the lower deck, the interior starts with a lower lounge in a design reminiscent of the larger Bluegame models. However, instead of three steps down from the aft platform, it’s five on the SP110, so there isn’t the visual connectivity to the aft deck you might hope for.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

Starboard view of the lower lounge on Almax

 

Like the main saloon, the lower lounge can be dressed and laid out to the owner’s taste. On Almax, this includes a bar and leather chair to starboard, and a carpeted side to port with sofas facing the mirrored wall, which features a cleverly disguised TV screen.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

The lower lounge has aft and port sofas

 

A central hallway leads first to identical VIP suites on each side, each with a forward-facing bed and en-suite bathroom, while forward to port is a flexible guest cabin, also with en-suite.

 

The master suite is on starboard side and features an inward-facing bed, with an elegant walk-in wardrobe aft and the en-suite forward.

 

Sanlorenzo, SP110, Smart Performance, Cannes Yachting Festival, Simpson Marine, Asia, Bernardo Zuccon, Pierro Lissoni, Tilli Antonelli, Pershing, Wider, MJP, waterjet, Marco Arnaboldi, Massimo Perotti, MAN V12, engines, Mediterranean

The owner’s suite to starboard

 

Lissoni, for one, is confident of the success of the Smart Performance line. “The SP110 is the first of what will genuinely be a new generation ofyachts.”

www.simpsonmarine.com/manufacturer/sanlorenzo

 

SHARE

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

Lagoon 51 spearheads catamaran leader’s green focus

Lagoon 51 spearheads catamaran leader’s green focus

SHARE

With a lighter structure, forward mast, shorter rig and overlapping genoa, the Lagoon 51 is even livelier on the water than her predecessor, while also introducing the new emphasis on solar power that will characterise the brand’s future models.
Words: Francois Tregouet. Photos: Gilles Martin-Raget & Nicolas Claris

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

Designed to be more ecological, more accessible and more connected, the Lagoon 51 unveiled in 2022 further refreshes the brand’s midsize offerings following the release of the 55 last year.

 

This year, the doors of the International Multihull Show at La Grande Motte had barely closed when the pontoons opened, releasing the 51’s ‘world premiere’ hull for a delivery trip southwest to Canet-en-Roussillon under the command of Bruno Belmont, aka ‘Monsieur Lagoon’!

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

While the milestone of the 6,000th Lagoon was passed in early 2021, and the fact that the 600 new catamarans scheduled to leave the three dedicated factories this year won’t be enough to satisfy an extremely dynamic market, no one at the world’s biggest pleasure cat builder is resting on their laurels, releasing a model that marks a huge step forward in their eco-friendly offerings.

 

The platform for the Lagoon 51 is based on that of the former 50, although the mast position has been significantly shifted, among many changes and aspects explained by Belmont, Groupe Beneteau’s Sailing Product Development Manager and the spiritual father of the first Lagoons as well as Sense monohulls and Excess catamarans.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

Belmont’s abundant yet realistic creativity, and ability to anticipate expectations and analyse the evolution of uses make him more than just a designer. He’s a ‘visionary’ according to naval architect Marc Van Peteghem, who along with VPLP partner Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, continues to handle naval architecture of all Lagoon models, long after the trio met while studying in Southampton.

 

Inventing the boat that doesn’t yet exist but that will be a great success tomorrow is Belmont’s rare talent and a precious one for Group Beneteau. Many shipyards are now trying to move towards more eco-responsible boats, but it was back in 2006 that Belmont created Groupe Beneteau’s 12-strong working group on sustainability, although the crisis of 2008-09 halted the project.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

The topic is more relevant than ever, while Belmont remains uncompromising in his research and standards. When he realised a major supplier of fabrics made from recycled fibre was importing the ‘green’ textiles by flying them across the Atlantic, he immediately switched to a company more holistic in its approach.

 

SOLAR SHIFT, MAST MOVED

For the Lagoon 51, the new leap was just as dramatic, with solar panels generating 3,020W integrated into the coachroof and hard top. This power output is enough to supply all the electricity needed on board – excluding air-conditioning – under way and at anchor.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

The bonding of the Solbian flexible panels has been meticulously executed, but although the panels are guaranteed for five years, only time will show the hardiness of the most curved areas. With similar impact, a brutal assessment was made of the choice taken a decade ago to shift the mast aft to the centre of the coachroof.

 

The large self-tacking solent and the short boom had their advantages, but the only solution to increase the sail area and thus improve performance under sail was to go for a taller rig. This didn’t benefit seakeeping, as pitching is the enemy of multihulls.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, LithiumLagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

So, back to a mast stepped on the median beam, at 40 per cent of the overall length aft of the bow. On the scales, the light displacement has reduced by 1,000 kg or five per cent compared to the 50. With the structure lightened by 750kg, a rig that’s more than 6ft feet shorter and an overlapping genoa, the Lagoon 51 is designed to be livelier on the water than her predecessor.

 

However, following the stormy conditions endured at the boat show, just 36 hours later the sea was like a millpond, so we set out by putting the twin 80hp Yanmar engines to the test. The power is evidence that the Lagoon 51 tries to offer standard equipment that’s more suitable for more users than offered elsewhere, when an attractive ‘from’ price rarely coincides with what clients need.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

The Lagoon 51’s owner’s layout, which includes four cabins, a dressing area and three bathrooms, is the standard version.

 

As we waited for the thermal breeze promised by the forecast for the early afternoon, we made a direct course at eight knots, with the engines at 2,200rpm each consuming 5.2-5.5 litres per hour and giving a range of over 750nm. From the flybridge, Belmont was enjoying a 360-degree view, so we took the opportunity to have a look all around the boat.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

CAR STYLING, BETTER ACCESS

As well as volume and interior comfort, the Lagoon 51 features a strong focus on exterior design. Former car designer Patrick le Quément – now associated with VPLP for a new life in boating – works on every detail. A bow angle, a topside line, a bimini radius: nothing escapes him.

 

With his very elaborate coachroof, it’s clear that under his impetus, the Lagoon range in general and this new 51 in particular has become yet more elegant, with the angle cut at the back of the side windows our only reservation.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

The concern for a more harmonious catamaran was something shared by all those involved in the project. For example, in cooperation with Lancelin rope manufacturers, the halyards are now of the same shade, having formerly been too brightly coloured. They can be identified by a relevant number of strands of appropriate colours for each of the reefs – one, two or three – or in the axis for the halyards, for example.

 

These are details compared to the attention paid to access and circulation. This starts at the transoms, with easier access for stepping aboard due to their shape and positioning, which brings them closer to the dock. Their size is also more welcoming and there’s no need to jostle when getting off the dinghy – three people can stand together without getting in each other’s way.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

Only two steps up and the cockpit and the entire nacelle are immediately accessible because the sugarscoops are slightly higher off the water and the thickness between the underside of the bridgedeck and the cockpit sole has been reduced.

 

This benefits the cockpit, whose vast surface area is divided into three zones. An adjustable plancha grill is next to the aft bench seat, a lounger occupies the starboard side, and an L-shaped bench seat surrounds the table on the port side. Part of the seat can be shifted forward to enlarge the table when at anchor, for instance, but this hinders direct access to the flybridge.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

Once inside, with the bay window closed, engine noise reduces, and everything is a luxury and a pleasure. Thankfully, the cumbersome mast support-strut in the saloon of the 50 has disappeared.

 

Furthermore, the owner’s hull is even more luxurious, with its vanity/dressing area fitted as standard. As for the port hull, it offers three berths in the standard version. The furniture and decor, signed by Italy’s Nauta Design, is as warm as ever, and the materials are plush. We really liked the large opening hatch by the mast foot. This will be an important source of natural ventilation at anchor.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

 SOLID PERFORMER

Eventually, the wind picked up as we got in sight of the Pyrenees and it was time to hoist the sails. A little trip onto the bimini to help the battens clear the lazy jacks indicates that a less perilous solution needs to be found, although as Belmont handled manoeuvres, it appeared to be child’s play. Halyards and sheets all come back to the central helm station with the optional electric winches.

 

From up there, you have an ideal view of the sail plan. Under the Code 0, our speed was oscillating between 7.8 to 8 knots, which was the true wind speed. Admittedly, we were on a heading at 60 degrees off the apparent, but even under genoa, we were pleasantly surprised to exceed seven knots at 55 degrees off the wind.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

The return to a more forward-set rig clearly influences the new sail-plan distribution. With Lagoon consulting the suppliers and even seeking the expertise of an external design team, the mast no longer has aggressive diamond stays for the genoas but two sets of aft-swept spreaders.

 

While being lighter, the profile of the mast divides the canvas better and offers more adjustment possibilities. As for the sails, they have been entrusted to Elvstrøm, renowned as master sailmakers, while owners can request sails made from recycled materials, another Lagoon initiative.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

The 51 is the start of a new direction for Lagoon. There’s a real awareness of the ecological impact of leisure boating, with 80 per cent of the carbon footprint of a boat coming from its use.

 

Sailing, natural ventilation rather than air-conditioning, more solar panels, no or less use of a generator, are all positive signals from this new model, which maintains the brand’s reputation for comfort and quality of finish.

 

Lagoon, 51, catamaran, sailing, Francois Tregouet, Gilles Martin-Raget, Nicolas Claris, International Multihull Show, La Grande Motte, Bruno Belmont, Canet-en-Roussillon, Sense, Excess, Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP, Vincent Lauriot-Prevost, Pyrenees, solar panel, eco, sustainability, electric, Lithium

 

The next major evolution will concern the engines, with a move to hybrid then electric. Lagoon still needs to address the question of energy storage, according to Belmont, who is keen to see nanotechnologies revolutionise the battery market.

 

In the meantime, the new 51 pays attention to its weight, lines, accessibility and life on board, with Lagoon creating an ever more refined cruising experience.

www.cata-lagoon.com

www.simpsonmarine.com


SHARE